In Yuridia Torres’ workshop, the sale of pinatas is nonstop.

Despite the Mexican government’s warning against traditional posadas — celebrations which began Wednesday and play an enormous role within the country’s Christmas season — people within the capital’s Xochimilco neighborhood continued to shop for the festive party item.

Posadas traditionally bring people into the streets and into the homes of neighbors across Mexico and in other parts of Latin America over the course of nine nights.

The holiday custom involves going door-to-door singing Christmas carols, sometimes dressed as characters from the biblical Christmas story.

Even with a spike in coronavirus infections and occupancy rate at 82 percent in Mexico City , orders for pinatas are still coming in.

“The posadas are postponed, but there are people that will celebrate the vacations with their family,” 47-year-old Torres, an area factory administrator, told AFP.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador reiterated Wednesday his call to “only go outdoors for essentials” during the top of the year.

Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum’s warning was more explicit: “No parties, meetings or posadas.”

The tradition, which mixes Christian beliefs with indigenous customs, can cause giant fiestas, bringing together thousands of individuals .

Although posadas aren’t expressly prohibited, authorities within the capital are considering fining those that throw parties of quite 10 people.

Brightly decorated pinatas are a central element of the vacation . The hollow cardboard creations are generally shaped as stars, animals, or characters and full of candy or fruit. Participants then beat them with a stick until their contents fall to the bottom .

In Xochimilco, a community closely linked to tradition, some like Hilda Varela try to seek out a middle ground.

The 66-year-old doctor will hold a celebration on Facebook after preparing for 10 months.

“By tradition, you can’t close the door to God. albeit online, we’ll proceed ,” she told AFP.

Apart from pinatas, sales of poinsettias, a red flower indigenous to Mexico used for Christmas decorations, also are doing well this year.

Some 16 million plants are sold in Mexico, consistent with the Agriculture ministry.

“We feared that sales would fall, but because of local consumption we sold almost 30,000 plants,” Edgar Lopez who manages the San Marcos greenhouse told AFP.

But Julieta Lopez, who sells both pinatas and poinsettias, said she fears sales will decrease if more restrictions are put in situ .

Mexico has recorded 1.27 million Covid-19 cases and 115,099 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

In Yuridia Torres’ workshop, the sale of pinatas is nonstop.

Despite the Mexican government’s warning against traditional posadas — celebrations which began Wednesday and play an enormous role within the country’s Christmas season — people within the capital’s Xochimilco neighborhood continued to shop for the festive party item.

Posadas traditionally bring people into the streets and into the homes of neighbors across Mexico and in other parts of Latin America over the course of nine nights.

The holiday custom involves going door-to-door singing Christmas carols, sometimes dressed as characters from the biblical Christmas story.

Even with a spike in coronavirus infections and occupancy rate at 82 percent in Mexico City , orders for pinatas are still coming in.

“The posadas are postponed, but there are people that will celebrate the vacations with their family,” 47-year-old Torres, an area factory administrator, told AFP.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador reiterated Wednesday his call to “only go outdoors for essentials” during the top of the year.

Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum’s warning was more explicit: “No parties, meetings or posadas.”

The tradition, which mixes Christian beliefs with indigenous customs, can cause giant fiestas, bringing together thousands of individuals .

Although posadas aren’t expressly prohibited, authorities within the capital are considering fining those that throw parties of quite 10 people.

Brightly decorated pinatas are a central element of the vacation . The hollow cardboard creations are generally shaped as stars, animals, or characters and full of candy or fruit. Participants then beat them with a stick until their contents fall to the bottom .

In Xochimilco, a community closely linked to tradition, some like Hilda Varela try to seek out a middle ground.

The 66-year-old doctor will hold a celebration on Facebook after preparing for 10 months.

“By tradition, you can’t close the door to God. albeit online, we’ll proceed ,” she told AFP.

Apart from pinatas, sales of poinsettias, a red flower indigenous to Mexico used for Christmas decorations, also are doing well this year.

Some 16 million plants are sold in Mexico, consistent with the Agriculture ministry.

“We feared that sales would fall, but because of local consumption we sold almost 30,000 plants,” Edgar Lopez who manages the San Marcos greenhouse told AFP.

But Julieta Lopez, who sells both pinatas and poinsettias, said she fears sales will decrease if more restrictions are put in situ .

Mexico has recorded 1.27 million Covid-19 cases and 115,099 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

In Yuridia Torres’ workshop, the sale of pinatas is nonstop.

Despite the Mexican government’s warning against traditional posadas — celebrations which began Wednesday and play an enormous role within the country’s Christmas season — people within the capital’s Xochimilco neighborhood continued to shop for the festive party item.

Posadas traditionally bring people into the streets and into the homes of neighbors across Mexico and in other parts of Latin America over the course of nine nights.

The holiday custom involves going door-to-door singing Christmas carols, sometimes dressed as characters from the biblical Christmas story.

Even with a spike in coronavirus infections and occupancy rate at 82 percent in Mexico City , orders for pinatas are still coming in.

“The posadas are postponed, but there are people that will celebrate the vacations with their family,” 47-year-old Torres, an area factory administrator, told AFP.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador reiterated Wednesday his call to “only go outdoors for essentials” during the top of the year.

Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum’s warning was more explicit: “No parties, meetings or posadas.”

The tradition, which mixes Christian beliefs with indigenous customs, can cause giant fiestas, bringing together thousands of individuals .

Although posadas aren’t expressly prohibited, authorities within the capital are considering fining those that throw parties of quite 10 people.

Brightly decorated pinatas are a central element of the vacation . The hollow cardboard creations are generally shaped as stars, animals, or characters and full of candy or fruit. Participants then beat them with a stick until their contents fall to the bottom .

In Xochimilco, a community closely linked to tradition, some like Hilda Varela try to seek out a middle ground.

The 66-year-old doctor will hold a celebration on Facebook after preparing for 10 months.

“By tradition, you can’t close the door to God. albeit online, we’ll proceed ,” she told AFP.

Apart from pinatas, sales of poinsettias, a red flower indigenous to Mexico used for Christmas decorations, also are doing well this year.

Some 16 million plants are sold in Mexico, consistent with the Agriculture ministry.

“We feared that sales would fall, but because of local consumption we sold almost 30,000 plants,” Edgar Lopez who manages the San Marcos greenhouse told AFP.

But Julieta Lopez, who sells both pinatas and poinsettias, said she fears sales will decrease if more restrictions are put in situ .

Mexico has recorded 1.27 million Covid-19 cases and 115,099 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

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